Tag Archives: Davetta Belton

Black Ink TV: Oct. 9 show

 

Black Ink TV is our new web series for aspiring broadcast journalists, on-air talent and producers. We post bi-weekly and members get to share their talent for the world to see. We’re working on making Black Ink TV better with every take.

This week features:

HUABJ’s trip to Washington D.C., Hofstra’s School of Communication name change, a story on college debt and an entertainment piece on Rihanna and more.

-Claudia Balthazar, President 

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NYC Stop and Frisk Policy

Violence is still an issue in the United States despite the laws established to limit it. NYPD’s stop-and-frisk policy, passed during the Bloomberg Administration in 2002, claims to limit the amount of violence on New York City streets; it allowed for police officers to stop and question any suspicious civilians.

Stop-and-Frisk intended to reduce crime and create security within neighborhoods. Despite Mayor Bloomberg’s thoughts on how this would take guns off of NYC’s streets, the stop-and-frisk policy backfired. According to the New York State’s Civil Liberties Union, the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk practices raise serious concerns over racial profiling, illegal stops and privacy rights. Claims show that the policy targets minorities within certain communities, such as Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

NYCLU 2011 briefing states that, “In 70 out of 76 precincts, blacks and Latinos accounted for more than half of all stops. Led by the 46th and 42nd Precincts in the Bronx with 98.5 percent of black and Latino stops, there were 33 precincts where more than 90 percent of those stopped were black and Latino.”

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Surban Poverty on Long Island

Scott Allard, associate professor at the University of Chicago, defined the connotative meanings of urban and suburban poverty on September 26, 2013 Hofstra University. He talked about the truth that lies behind poverty in the surrounding communities.

“Urban means poor and suburban equals opportunity,” he stated at the Changing Geography of Poverty and the American Safety Net Conference.

The community is labeled based off the people within it; Mostly African-American communities are labeled as urban while mostly Caucasian communities are labeled as suburban. Despite the connotative perspectives, Allard stated that there is no formal definition of a suburb because it is more than geography.

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