Tag Archives: hofstra university

Former Skinhead Frank Meeink Inspires Hope

“Your job is to be the old elephant,” said Frank Meeink — a former neo-Nazi skinhead — staring into a crowd of Hofstra University staff and students, wearing an unbuttoned flannel t-shirt with his sleeves rolled up to his elbows and his forearms covered in tattoos, encouraging them to show the younger generation how to treat other’s as equals.

“It’s so great that he’s able to admit his wrong doings and now he’s able to help others,” said Joy Jones, a freshman journalism student who was empowered by Meeink’s words.

Meeink grew up in South Philadelphia, where he struggled with identity issues and lived in a combative home. His mother battled drug abuse and he struggled to cope with an abusive stepfather. “He used to tell me we’re at war over my mom,” he said.

Meeink lost that war and not before long, he was sent to live with his father in West Philadelphia. One summer, Meeink was excited to go visit his uncle in the suburbs of Lancaster, PA. He looked forward to hanging out with his cousin who loved to skateboard and had a half-pipe in his backyard.

That trip changed Meeink’s life. Meeink’s cousin wasn’t the same. He was no longer the rock and roll loving skater kid who used egg whites and Elmer’s glue to keep his Mohawk standing straight. The half pipe was torn down as was the rock band poster’s Meeink remembered his in cousin’s room.

He had become a neo-Nazi skinhead and it didn’t take long to turn Meeink into one too.

Meeink went on to become a well-known leader of the neo-Nazi movement but after realizing error in his ways, he reconsidered his beliefs and abandoned the movement.

“If someone can go from one extreme to accepting everyone,” said Alexander Levine, a Jewish grad student who heard Meeink speak in high school. “Then that means change can happen.”

-Alexander M. Pineda

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Journalist Demetria Lucas visits Hofstra

On Wednesday, Oct. 8, blogger and journalist Demetria Lucas inspired an audience of roughly 25 students with an engaging discussion on resume building, networking and success as a media personality. Organized by Hofstra’s Collegiate Women of Color (CWC), the event featured an interview with Lucas, followed by a question and answer session from the audience. Shannon Alomar, vice president of CWC, coordinated the event and interviewed Lucas about her life, morals and career.

Dubbed as the “Black Carrie Bradshaw” in a Washington Post profile, Lucas began by talking about how she got her start in journalism—through blogging on Myspace about her relationship life. She then attended a networking event for the African American Women Journalists, and met with an editor for Essence magazine. “As a writer, you are always evolving,” said Lucas of her career.

Lucas talked about her first book, “A Belle in Brooklyn,” as a guide to dating culture. While dating in college and afterwards, Lucas advised young women not to be afraid to have standards.

“Keep a wide circle…grass is greener where it is watered,” said Lucas.

In addition to dating advice, Lucas advised the audience on building a brand and being successful in their individual fields.

“Make a list of what you want to be and choose the thing that is easiest and that will make you the most money,” Lucas recommended. She didn’t merge her professional life with her relationship life, and suggested that the audience does the same.

CWC president Mikwaevonn Mills talked of CWC as whole, and what it has gained from Lucas’ discussion. “From our discussion “Don’t Waste Your Pretty” with Demetria L. Lucas, our organization as a whole gained more skills to implement in different settings. For example, the work place, college classroom, etcetera,” said Mills.

Lucas’ advice and life experiences proved to be influential to the crowd, and especially to interviewer Alomar.

“Interviewing a prominent media influence such as Demetria was truly an honor,” said Alomar, who is also studying journalism. “There is something about getting answers out of someone who has been in your shoes before that truly makes me want to keep pursuing my dream. It’s like looking into a mirror and seeing myself in their position in some aspect.”

-Hayley Marks, Hofstra University

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HUABJ: Book Signing with Cheryl Wills, Open with Bryan Ogilvie

Photo taken by Jagoda Obuchowska

Photo taken by Jagoda Obuchowska

Hofstra University’s Association of Black Journalists high lighting event of the fall 2013 semester, Book Signing with Cheryl Wills, was a success.

“This is the greatest career to me in the world, you’re writing the first draft of history,” said NY1 Weekend Evening News Anchor Cheryl Wills, speaking to a group of prospective journalists at Hofstra University on Oct. 14, 2013.

Wills addressed stereotypes about how competitive the broadcast industry is and presented a general career plan, telling students “my objective (tonight) is to show you how to get there, and most importantly, straight off the bat, you can get there.” Her message sparked several smiles in the crowd.

Wills was invited to Hofstra for a book signing to commemorate the anniversaries of the Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington. The event was hosted by Hofstra University’s Association of Black Journalist in collaboration with the Hofstra Cultural Center, the Black Student Union, Collegiate Women of Color and Ed2010.

The television personality declared that the first step to success in the workforce is proactivity in the job hunt and getting ahead of the competition. Wills encouraged students to apply for jobs well before the end of senior year to possibly have a job lined up as soon as they graduate.

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Black Ink TV: Oct. 9 show

 

Black Ink TV is our new web series for aspiring broadcast journalists, on-air talent and producers. We post bi-weekly and members get to share their talent for the world to see. We’re working on making Black Ink TV better with every take.

This week features:

HUABJ’s trip to Washington D.C., Hofstra’s School of Communication name change, a story on college debt and an entertainment piece on Rihanna and more.

-Claudia Balthazar, President 

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Surban Poverty on Long Island

Scott Allard, associate professor at the University of Chicago, defined the connotative meanings of urban and suburban poverty on September 26, 2013 Hofstra University. He talked about the truth that lies behind poverty in the surrounding communities.

“Urban means poor and suburban equals opportunity,” he stated at the Changing Geography of Poverty and the American Safety Net Conference.

The community is labeled based off the people within it; Mostly African-American communities are labeled as urban while mostly Caucasian communities are labeled as suburban. Despite the connotative perspectives, Allard stated that there is no formal definition of a suburb because it is more than geography.

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Alpha Kappa Psi Honors Women in Business

L to R, Yeni Castro, Ashley Kowal, Brian St. Hubert, Christina Whitehurst, Dr. Elizabeth Venuti Photo credit: Claudia Balthazar

L to R, Yeni Castro, Ashley Kowal, Brian St. Hubert, Christina Whitehurst, Dr. Elizabeth Venuti Photo credit: Claudia Balthazar

Women all over the world are breaking through various barriers to work in the corporate world of America. Alpha Kappa Psi, a professional business fraternity, held the panel “women in business”, on Feb. 6, 2013 at Hofstra University, to inform the audience about a woman’s experience in the corporate world of business. During the panel, women discussed how females could play positive roles in their positions.

Yeni Castro, printer business planning associate of Canon USA, is new at her job and recognized that she’ll have to work to have a progressive future, just like anybody else. “There are going to be stereotypes and misconceptions but being a woman and knowing what job you have, you’ll look past that and do what it takes,” she said. “Do whatever you do one hundred percent.”

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The Museum of Modern Art adds piece by Hofstra Professor

Poster features in the MOMA by Hofstra ProfessorThe Museum of Modern Art in New York City (MOMA) recently added a “punk/post-punk archive” to its permanent collection; a poster that was created nearly 30 years ago by Tom Klinkowstein, Professor of Graphic Design and New Media in the Department of Fine Art at Hofstra University. Klinkowstein designed the poster in 1980 and has long since forgotten about it.

“Looking at it now, it is quite­ a piece of visual archeology: hand-made with label-maker typography in the tradition of ‘zines,” he said. “There’s the Polaroid SX-70 of Laurie Anderson and Peter Gordon and in the background is an image of an IBM digital device of some sort, very new for that time and a specter of things to come.”

Klinkowstein designed the poster, a lithograph, for performance artist Laurie Anderson. A lithograph is the process of printing from a plane surface, as a smooth stone or metal plate. “It is [also] what museums call “offset” printing, a common printing technology most newspapers use for instance,” Klinkowstein said.

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Reflections of October: Mental Health Awareness

Provided by the Active Minds official website: http://www.activeminds.org/

One in four students has a mental disorder, and it’s not always visible. Many college level students across the nation are not aware of this fact, according to “Active Minds.” For this reason, such an organization exists and seeks to educate people on the issue.

Created in 2003, Active Minds is a nonprofit organization with a distinct mission: “to help college students use their voice and change the conversation about mental health into something positive,” said Maggie Bertram, Active Minds Manager for Student Lead Initiatives.

October 9, 2012 was recognized as this year’s “National Day without Stigma.” This is a special day that promotes tolerance and addresses various stigmas associated with mental illness during “Mental Health Awareness Week.”The week is usually observed during the first full week of October, while “Day without Stigma” is held on a Monday or Tuesday of that week.

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